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Cumbria : Coniston
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Coniston is a picturesque lakeside village in the Lake District National Park. Coniston sits next to Coniston Water, the Lake District's third largest lake is the home to many attempts at the world water speed record. Sir Malcolm Campbell first broke the record on the lake in 1930 and his son Donald successfully broke the record four more times before his last attempt ended in disaster, crashing fatally at 300mph. The lake and its surroundings is also the inspiration for Arthur Ransome's Swallows and Amazons - whilst Coniston's other major literary connection is as the long term home of John Ruskin

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  • Brantwood, [1]. Impressive lakeside property that was home to John Ruskin; today opened to the public as a museum. Brantwood runs a number of courses, including art workshops and gardening courses, and holds regular events and exhibitions. There are extensive gardens and the Jumping Jenny restaurant with elevated terrace looking over Lake Coniston. Also available is a self catering holiday apartment within the house, that sleeps 2. Further details at Brantwood have recently refurbished the Lodge, a cottage on their estate with lake views, and this is now available as a holiday rental. This large house offers accommodation for up to 9 people and is ideal for small groups or large families looking for a holiday in the Lake District. For more details visit  edit
  • Ruskin Museum. museum celebrating the life and works of John Ruskin. Also has a section devoted to the Campbell's record breaking attempts  edit


  • Tour the lake on the steam yacht Gondola
  • Climb the Old Man of Coniston






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