Camargue

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The Camargue is a region in the departments of Bouches-du-Rhône and Gard in the southeast of France which encompasses the delta of the river Rhône. It is a wetland area of considerable natural value, and is best known for the presence of flamingoes, the breeding of semi-wild horses and black bulls, the cultivation of rice and the production of salt. It also has long, unspoilt beaches and offers great opportunities for biking. However, when driving through it, you may be excused for not finding it very spectacular: the area is very flat with few landmarks and buildings and it takes some time to explore and appreciate it.

Cities[edit]

There are only two larger towns in the area:

  • Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer, on the southern tip of the Camargue;
  • Aigues-Mortes, on the edge of the so-called Petit Camargue, in the west of the region. Close by you will also find the beach resort of Le Grau-du-Roi.

The eastern side of the Camargue is part of the municipality of Arles, and has no agglomerations to speak of; the largest village here is Salin-de-Giraud.

Other destinations[edit]

Parc Ornithologique du Pont de Gau - a series of lakes/scrapes which are home to many of the birds of the Camargue. The parc provides a good introduction to the native species.

To walk around the two sections takes about three hours, but the bird life on view will keep your attention and lengthen this time. Enthusiastic photographers could spend most of the day here.

Understand[edit]

Geography[edit]

The delta of the river Rhône is one of the largest in Europe. Just south of Arles, the river splits into the Grand Rhône and Petit Rhône. In between, we find the so-called Grande Camargue. The area to the west of the Petit Rhône is known as Petite Camargue. The Grand Camargue is a protected nature reserve. Sometimes, the coastal area to the east of the Grand Rhône up to Fos-sur-Mer, the Plan du Bourg, is also considered as part of the Camargue. Likewise, the term Petit Camargue is sometimes extended to the coastal area west of Aigues-Mortes in the department of Hérault.

The Canal du Rhône à Sète connects the Rhône river to the town of Sète, south of Montpellier. It runs more or less on the edge of the Petit Camargue, and has a side branch that connects to Aigues-Mortes and Le Grau-du-Roi.

The area consists of extensive wetlands, that progressively become more brackish the closer to the Mediterranean Sea you go. In the north of the region, most of the area is grassland, where cattle and horses are raised, with some vineyards on the higher elevations. The lower and wetter areas are used for rice cultivation. In the south, there are many lagoons (étangs) with an abundance of bird wildlife. The lagoons are traditionally also used for the production of salt.

History[edit]

The Camargue was formed some 10,000 years ago when sea levels started to rise after the last Ice Age, and the water of the river Rhône was blocked by the formation of sand bars along the Mediterranean coast, leading to the formation of brackish coastal marshlands. The Rhône brought large masses of mud into the area, that was deposited in the marshlands during floods. Since the building of the river dikes in 1869, however, all the sediment is transported to the coast, where the river is now progressively pushing the coastline seaward.

The region was already put into cultivation during Antiquity, and probably takes its name from the Romans, though the exact etymology is unknown. From the Middle Ages onwards, dikes were built to contain the river and sea water and drain the marshlands, which led to the expansion of agriculture and salt production. When higher dikes were built to contain the river Rhône in 1869, this reduced the number of floods, allowing for the introduction of viticulture in the area. After the Second World War, intensive rice cultivation was introduced as well. Industrial salt production was started in the late 19th century; currently, the Camargue is the largest salt producing area in Europe, though production figures are decreasing in recent years.

Since the region also offers good access to the Mediterranean Sea, the town of Aigues-Mortes was founded in 1240 by king Louis XI as the port for all ship traffic from and to France. However, the city lost its importance when the Provence with the port of Marseille were added to the French kingdom in 1481.

Because of its outstanding natural values, the nature reserve of the Étang de Vaccarès, the largest lagoon in the area, was already created in 1928. Since 1970, most of the Grande Camargue is a Parc Naturel Régional (Regional Natural Park). It has been classified as a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO.

Climate[edit]

The Camargue has a temperate Mediterranean climate, with irregular rainfall in all seasons. Autumn and Winter are however much wetter than the Summer months. Summer is characterized by lots of sunshine and high temperatures, though it is never too hot for comfort, and temperatures are moderated by frequent strong breezes, that are either coming from the west (tramontane) or the north (mistral). In Winter, nocturnal frost is quite common.

Climate Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Daily highs (°C) 10 12 15 18 21 26 29 28 25 20 15 11
Nightly lows (°C) 2 2 5 8 11 15 17 17 14 10 6 3
Precipitation (mm) 69 59 72 51 49 41 22 42 75 107 67 68

Average temperatures and precipitation in Aigues-Mortes

Talk[edit]

Get in[edit]

By car[edit]

The Camargue only has a few access roads. Arles is the point of access for the Grande Camargue, with the D570 running from Arles to Saintes-Marie-de-la-Mer. Aigues-Mortes and the Petite Camargue can be reached quite easily from Montpellier via Lunel and from Nîmes via Saint-Gilles. Distances:

  • Arles - Saintes-Marie-de-la-Mer 37km (approx. 35 min)
  • Montpellier - Aigues-Mortes 34km (approx. 40 min)
  • Nîmes - Aigues-Mortes 44km (approx. 45 min)

By public transport[edit]

There are no train stations in the Camargue, the closest is found in Arles. Bus connections into the area are limited. There is a frequent direct bus (line 20) from Arles to Saintes-Marie-de-la-Mer (approx. 25 min). Itineraries can be found on www.lepilote.com. There is also a direct bus connection (line C32) from Nîmes to Aigues-Mortes (approx. 45 min). Schedules can be found on the website of Edgard.

By bike[edit]

Cycling into the Camargue is easily done from Arles (approx. 2.5 hrs to Saintes-Marie-de-la-Mer), but it takes much more time from Nîmes or Montpellier. In Arles, you can rent bikes at the railway station.

On foot[edit]

The GR700 242km long-distance trail, (Chemin de Régordane or Route de Saint-Gilles) runs from Le Puy-en-Velay (Haute-Loire) to Saint-Gilles. From there, you can walk another 26 kms to Aigues-Mortes.

By boat[edit]

Surprisingly, there are no boat connections into the area. You can however rent your own motor vessel to explore the rivers and canals, for example from Saint-Gilles with Le Boat, or from Aigues-Mortes with Nicols. For these barges, you don't need sailing experience.

Get around[edit]

  • By bike:
  • By foot:
  • By boat: The Canal crosses with ease the Gard part of the Camargue along a thirty km stretch that links the Rhône to the Mediterranean at Le Grau-du-Roi. It is a natural waterway in a landscape where specific flora and fauna dwell together in harmony.

No need to be a good sailor, it's enough to climb aboard one of the comfortable river boats and let oneself be carried for an afternoon. Or you might like to rent a small barge with family or friends, and spend an adventurous few days in the reeds. Or perhaps board a hotel-barge for a day or two and take a guided water tour of the Gard.

See[edit][add listing]

Itineraries[edit]

Do[edit][add listing]

Cycling[edit]

The area is very flat with little traffic, so it is ideal for cycling. However, it can be quite windy, so be prepared for that. Some dedicated cycling paths run through the area, in particular along the coast.

Birdwatching[edit]

The area is well-known for its abundant bird wildlife, in particular the flamingoes that are concentrated in the Étang du Fangassier.

Horse riding[edit]

Sleep[edit][add listing]

There are numerous hotels on way from Arles to Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer. Some of them worth considering include:

  • Les Arnelles, (450m outside of the St-M-dl-M, on the left side of the road just after Le Pont Des Bannes hotel). Bar 8am to 11pm  edit

Eat[edit][add listing]

A rice field in the Camargue

Rice[edit]

Rice cultivation in the region already started in the Middle Ages, but it only became more important after the Second World War. The production figures are not very high, with only 4% of the European rice production coming from the area. The rice grown has its own Protected Geographical Indication (Indication Géographique Protégée, or IGP). It is sold either as white rice, or as whole-grain red or brown rice.

Local dishes[edit]

Specialty foods of the Camargue include:

  • Bouillabaisse
  • Anchoïade
  • Anguilles au four
  • Gardiane de Taureau
  • Salade Camarguaise
  • Aubergines aux anchois et aux capres
  • Barbouillade d'artichauts
  • Brandade de Morue
  • Canard aux figues
  • Moules en Brasucado
  • Hachis camarguais
  • Fougasse d'Aigues Mortes
  • La Broufado

Restaurants[edit]

For non-French people, the huge importance attached to local food and cuisine can sometimes seem a bit exaggerated. However, you can be sure that the best food is not to be found in the touristic zones, and French people (and websites) will know the better places to go.

Some general suggestions for finding good places:

  • Restaurants out of town, even in remote locations. These usually rely on local customers and stick with regional cuisine.
  • Restaurants with menus listing mostly or exclusively local specialties (see the list above)
  • Ferme Auberge (farm inn), an official government program. Members usually serve local cuisine, though the menu selection may be limited.
  • Restaurants that are members of the Conservatoire des Cuisines de Camargue, (society for the preservation of Camargue cuisine)
  • Table d'hôte (guest table), a kind of intimate restaurant. Often a bed and breakfast which prepares dinner with advance reservation. Not to be confused with table d'hôtes in regular restaurants that offer communal tables for solo diners.

Here are some restaurants that look promising per above recommendations as of Sept 2010 (although not tried hands-on by Wikitravelers yet):

  • close to Saintes Maries de la Mer:
    • Le Flamant Rose, 04 90 97 10 18 (, fax: 04 90 97 12 47), [1]. Member of a society for the preservation of true Camargue cuisine. Local specialties, plus a remote location.  edit
    • Le Pont des Bannes, [2]. Very elegant. Hits every major local specialty and has almost nothing from outside the region on the menu. Dinner menus: starter+main+dessert: €43; starter+main: €36; main+dessert: 31; starter+dessert: 17.  edit
    • Mas de Peint, [3]. Table d’hote, by reservation only. Breakfast: €22; lunch: €42; dinner: €55.  edit
    • La Tour du Cazeau, Arles The Sambuc, 04 90 97 21 6 (, fax: 04 90 97 20 70), [4]. Ferme-auberge, by reservation only. Dinner menu: €25.  edit
  • away from Saintes Maries de la Mer:
    • Le Tamaris, 13 rue Victor Hugo, Le Cailar, +33 (0)4 66 88 07 91 (), [5]. The most rustic – most likely to prepare food you absolutely cannot get outside of the Camargue. The display of their dishes, remote location, and menu selection suggests it is probably a worthwhile experience. Set menu: €13..16.  edit

Drink[edit][add listing]

Wine[edit]

The Camargue has its own terroir, known as Sable de Camargue, located in the Petit Camargue. The wines from this region are therefore known as vin de sable, referring to the sandy soils where they are grown. They are predominantly rosé wines, made from a variety of grapes. The most sold is the so-called vin gris, with a very pale salmon colour, that is very light in taste. The best-known brand is Listel, that is sold all over France and abroad, but you can find many more producers in the area.

Stay safe[edit]

It's not a real risk, but be aware that the Camargue is home to an enormous number of mosquitoes, which may make staying there quite unpleasant in Summer.

Get out[edit]




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