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Bengali phrasebook

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Bengali or Bangla is the native language of the ethno-cultural region eastern South Asia known as Bengal. It is the sole official language of Bangladesh, and one of the 22 offical "scheduled" languages of India. It is also the state official language of West Bengal, and parts of the Indian states of Tripura and Assam. With about 220 million native and over 250 million total speakers, Bengali is one of the most spoken languages, ranked sixth/seventh in the world. The national songs of both India and Bangladesh were composed in the Bengali language by Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore. It is the most commonly spoken language in India's third largest city, Kolkata and Bangladesh's largest city Dhaka. In 2010 UNESCO, on behalf of the United Nations officially declared Bangla as the sweetest language in the world.

Grammar[edit]

The following is a sample text in Bengali of the Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (by the United Nations):

ধারা ১: সমস্ত মানুষ স্বাধীনভাবে সমান মর্যাদা এবং অধিকার নিয়ে জন্মগ্রহণ করে। তাঁদের বিবেক এবং বুদ্ধি আছে; সুতরাং সকলেরই একে অপরের প্রতি ভ্রাতৃত্বসুলভ মনোভাব নিয়ে আচরণ করা উচিৎ।
— Bengali in Bengali script

Dhara êk: Shômosto mãnush shãdhinbhãbe shômãn môrjãdã ebong odhikãr nie jônmogrohon kôre. Tãder bibek ebong buddhi ãchhe; shutorãng shôkoleri êke ôporer proti bhrãttrittoshulôbh mônobhãb nie ãchorôn kôrã uchit.
— Bengali in Transcription, faithful to pronunciation.

Clause 1: All human free-manner-in equal dignity and right taken birth-take do. Their reason and intelligence is; therefore everyone-indeed one another's towards brotherhood-ly attitude taken conduct do should.
— Word to word gloss.

Article 1: All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience. Therefore, they should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
— Translation.

Pronunciation guide[edit]

The phonemic inventory of Bengali consists of 40 consonants and 11 vowels, which may be nasalized to change meaning. Vowel sounds can either be independent or hooked on to the consonant in the form of diacritics. Bengali vowels tend to be difficult to pronounce for a non-Bengali speaker.

Vowels[edit]

The independent vowel is on the left, the diacritic (which is hooked on to the consonant) is on the right.

অ 
Like "o" in "cot" /ɔ/.
আ া 
Like "a" in "father" /a/.
এ ে 
Like "e" in "bed" /e/.
ঐ ৈ 
Like "oy" in "boy" /oi/.
ই ি 
Like "e" in "legal" /i/.
ঈ ী 
Like "ee" in "feed" /i:/.
উ ু 
Like "u" in "rune" /u/.
ঊ ূ 
Like "oo" in "tool" /u:/.
ঋ ৃ 
Like "ree" in "free" /ri/.
ও ো 
Like "o" in "local" /o/.
ঔ ৌ 
Like "ow" in "bowl" /o:/.

Consonants[edit]

ব 
Like "b" in "boy" (b).
চ 
Like "ch" in "cheat" (ç).
দ 
Like "d" in "doubt" (d).
ফ 
Like "f" in "frog" (f).
গ 
Like "g" in "go" (g).
হ 
Like "h" in "hit" (h).
জ 
Like "j" in "juggle" (j).
ক 
Like "k" in "skin" (k).
ল 
Like "l" in "loud" (l).
ম 
Like "m" in "man" (m).
ণ 
Like "n" in "no" (n).
ঙ 
Like "ng" in "king" (ng).
প 
Like "p" in "spit" (p).
র 
Like "r" in "run", but slightly trilled (r).
স 
Like "s" in "so" (s).
ত 
Like "t" in "talk" (t).
য 
Like "y" in "yes" (y).

Aspirated consonants[edit]

Aspirated consonants are pronounced with a puff of air.

ভ 
Like "b" in "blight" (b').
ছ 
Like "ch" in "cheese" (ç').
ধ 
Like "d" in "din" (d').
ঘ 
Like "g" in "language" (g').
ঝ 
Like "j" in "jam" (j').
খ 
Like "k" in "kick" (k').
ফ 
Like "p" in "pit" (p').
ঠ 
Like "t" in "tin" (t').

Bengali is known for its wide variety of diphthongs, combinations of vowels occurring within the same syllable.

Stress[edit]

In standard jarif, stress is predominantly initial. Bengali words are virtually all trochaic; the primary stress falls on the initial syllable of the word, while secondary stress often falls on all odd-numbered syllables thereafter, giving strings such as shô-ho-jo-gi-ta "cooperation", where the boldface represents primary and secondary stress.

Consonant Clusters[edit]

Native Bengali (tôdbhôbo) words do not allow initial consonant clusters; the maximum syllabic structure is CVC (i.e. one vowel flanked by a consonant on each side). Many speakers of Bengali restrict their phonology to this pattern, even when using Sanskrit or English borrowings, such as গেরাম geram (CV.CVC) for গ্রাম gram (CCVC) "village" or ইস্কুল iskul (VC.CVC) for স্কুল skul (CCVC) "school".

Word order[edit]

Bengali nouns are not assigned gender, which leads to minimal changing of adjectives (inflection). However, nouns and pronouns are moderately declined (altered depending on their function in a sentence) into four cases while verbs are heavily conjugated, and the verbs do not change form depending on the gender of the nouns.As a head-final language, Bengali follows subject–object–verb word order, although variations to this theme are common. Bengali makes use of postpositions, as opposed to the prepositions used in English and other European languages. Determiners follow the noun, while numerals, adjectives, and possessors precede the noun.

Yes-no questions do not require any change to the basic word order; instead, the low (L) tone of the final syllable in the utterance is replaced with a falling (HL) tone. Additionally optional particles (e.g. কি -ki, না -na, etc.) are often encliticized onto the first or last word of a yes-no question. Wh-questions are formed by fronting the wh-word to focus position, which is typically the first or second word in the utterance.

Nouns[edit]

Nouns and pronouns are inflected for case, including nominative, objective, genitive (possessive), and locative.[13] The case marking pattern for each noun being inflected depends on the noun's degree of animacy. When a definite article such as -টা -ţa (singular) or -গুলা -gula (plural) is added nouns are also inflected for number. When counted, nouns take one of a small set of measure words. As in many East Asian languages (like Chinese, Japanese, Thai, etc.), nouns in Bengali cannot be counted by adding the numeral directly adjacent to the noun. The noun's measure word (MW) must be used between the numeral and the noun. Most nouns take the generic measure word -টা -ţa, though other measure words indicate semantic classes (e.g. -জন -jon for humans). Measuring nouns in Bengali without their corresponding measure words (e.g. আট বিড়াল aţ biŗal instead of আটটা বিড়াল aţ-ţa biŗal "eight cats") would typically be considered ungrammatical. However, when the semantic class of the noun is understood from the measure word, the noun is often omitted and only the measure word is used, e.g. শুধু একজন থাকবে। Shudhu êk-jon thakbe. (lit. "Only one-MW will remain.") would be understood to mean "Only one person will remain.", given the semantic class implicit in -জন -jon.

In this sense, all nouns in Bengali, unlike most other Indo-European languages, are similar to mass nouns.

Verbs[edit]

Verbs divide into two classes: finite and non-finite. Non-finite verbs have no inflection for tense or person, while finite verbs are fully inflected for person (first, second, third), tense (present, past, future), aspect (simple, perfect, progressive), and honor (intimate, familiar, and formal), but not for number. Conditional, imperative, and other special inflections for mood can replace the tense and aspect suffixes. The number of inflections on many verb roots can total more than 200.

Inflectional suffixes in the morphology of Bengali vary from region to region, along with minor differences in syntax.

Bengali differs from most Indo-Aryan Languages in the zero copula, where the copula or connective be is often missing in the present tense. Thus "he is a teacher" is she shikkhôk, (literally "he teacher"). In this respect, Bengali is similar to Russian and Hungarian.

Vocabulary[edit]

Bengali is the most influenced one of all the South Asian languages. It has as many as 100,000 separate words, of which 50,000 are considered tôtshômo (direct reborrowings from Sanskrit and Prakrit), 21,100 are tôdbhôbo (native words with Sanskrit cognates), and the rest being bideshi (foreign borrowings) and deshi (Austroasiatic borrowings) words.

However, these figures do not take into account the fact that a large proportion of these words are archaic or highly technical, minimizing their actual usage. The productive vocabulary used in modern literray works, in fact, is made up mostly (67%) of tôdbhôbo words, while tôtshômo only make up 25% of the total. Deshi and Bideshi words together make up the remaining 8% of the vocabulary used in modern Bengali literature.

Due to centuries of contact with Europeans, Mughals, Arabs, Turks, Persians, Afghans, and East Asians, Bengali has incorporated many words from foreign languages. The most common borrowings from foreign languages come from three different kinds of contact. Close contact with neighboring peoples facilitated the borrowing of words from Hindi, Assamese and several indigenous Austroasiatic languages (like Santali) of Bengal. After centuries of invasions from Persia and the Middle East, numerous Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Pashtun words were absorbed into Bengali. Portuguese, French, Dutch and English words were later additions during the colonial period.

Retroflex consonants[edit]

Retroflex consonants are pronounced with the tip of the tongue flapping against the roof of the mouth.

ড 
Like "d" in "doubt" but retroflex (đ).
ড় 
Like "r" in "run" but slightly trilled retroflex (ŗ).
ত 
Like "t" in "talk" but retroflex (ţ).

Aspirated retroflex consonants[edit]

Aspirated retroflex consonants are pronounced with the tip of the tongue flapping against the roof of the mouth and a puff of air.

ঢ 
Like "d" in "din" but retroflex (đ').
থ 
Like "t" in "tin" but retroflex (ţ').

Phrase list[edit]

Basics[edit]

Common signs

Ami
YOU 
Apni/Tumi
YOUR 
Apnãr/Tomãr
WE 
Amrã
OUR 
Amãder
HE 
Shê
HIS 
Tãr/Or
SHE 
Shê
HER 
Tãr/Or>
THEY 
Tãrã/Ora
IT 
Etã
THIS 
Etã
THAT 
Shetã
THESE 
Egulo
THOSE 
Ogulo
INSIDE 
Bhetore
OUTSIDE 
Baire
RIGHT SIDE 
Daan Dik
LEFT SIDE 
Baa Dik
WHAT 
Kee
WHO 
Ke
WHERE 
Kothay
WHEN 
Kokhon
HOW 
Ki bhabe
WHOM 
Kaake Dik
WHO's 
Kaar
OPEN 
খোলা (kholã)
CLOSED 
বন্ধ (bôndho)
ENTRANCE 
দরজা (dôrjã)
EXIT 
বাহির (bãhir)
PUSH 
ঠেলা (thelã)
PULL 
টানা (tãnã)
TOILET 
টয়লেট (toilet), পায়খানা (pãykhãnã)
MEN 
পুরুষ (purush)
WOMEN 
মহিলা (mohilã)
FORBIDDEN 
নিষিদ্ধ (nishiddho), নিষেধ (nishedh)


Greeting[edit]

Hello. (Hindu)

Nômoshkar

Hello. (Muslim)

Assalamualaikum.

How are you?

(Apni) kêmon achhen? (formal) (to somebody elder, senior, in a position of authority e.g. your boss)
(Tumi) kêmon achho? (informal) (your peers)
(Tui) kemon acchish? (implying in no respect) (typically used with very close friends, brothers, sisters, etc.)

(I'm) not fine.

(Ami) bhalo naa or sinmply Bhalo naa.

(I'm) fine.

(Ami) bhalo (achhi) or sinmply Bhalo.

Good morning.

Su probhat. (highly formal) or Good Morning in English
Shubho Shokal (formal)

Good evening.

Subho shondha. (highly formal)or Good Evening in English

Good night.

Subho ratri. (highly formal)or Good Night in English

Meeting[edit]

What is your name?

Apnar nam ki? (formal)
Tomar nam ki? (informal)
Tor naam ki? (childish phrase)

My name is ______ .

Amar nam ______ .

Nice to meet you.

Apnar shathe porichôe hoe amar khub-i bhalo laglo. (formal)
Tomar shathe porichôe hoe amar khub-i bhalo laglo. (informal)
Tor shathe porichôe hoe amar khub-i bhalo laglo. (phased to a childhood friend/junior family member)

Please.

Dôeakore. (formal)
Ektu. (lit. a little)

Thank you.

Dhonnobad. (formal)

You're welcome.

Tomake shagoto janai

Don't Mind

Kichhu mone korben na. (formal) (lit. please don't mind;)
Kichhu mone koro na. (informal) (lit. please don't mind;)

Yes.

Ji. (formal)
Hê. (informal)

No.

Ji na. (formal)
Na. (informal)

Excuse me. (getting attention)

Ei-je! (formal)
Ei! (informal)

Bhai/Dada (when addressing a man)
Didi/Boudi (when addressing a lady)
Excuse me. (to pass by someone)

Dekhi?

I love you

Ami tomake bhalobashi

I like you

Ami tomake pochhondo kori
Amar tōmake bhalō legeche.

I'm (very) sorry.

Ami (khub-i) dukkhito.

Forgive me.

Khôma korun. (formal)
Khôma kôro. (informal)
Maf korun. (formal)
Maf kôro. (informal)

Goodbye

Nomoshkar (Hindu)
Khoda Hafez / Allah Hafiz (Muslim)
Aashi (informal)

Problems[edit]

Problem(s)

Shômossha

Thief

Chor

Pickpocket

Poketmaar

Dacoit

Dakat

Murderer

Khooni

Criminal

Aporadhi

Leave me alone.

amay eka chhere din/dao

Don't touch me!

amay chhuyo naa.

Look out!

Shabdhan!

I'll call the police.

ami pulish daakbo.

Police!

pulish! pulish!

That man has stolen my (jewellery).

Oi lokti amar (goyna) churi korechhe .

I can't speak [name of language] (that well).

(Ami) [_____] (eto bhalo) bolte pari na.

Do you speak English?

Apni-ki Ingreji bolte paren? (formal)
Tumi-ki Ingreji bolte paro? (informal)

Is there someone here who speaks English?

Ekhane keu achhe, je Ingreji bolte paren?

I don't understand.

(Ami) bujhte parchhi na.
(Ami) bujhte parlam na.
(Ami) bujhlam na.
(Ami) bujhini.
(Ami) bujhinai.

Help!

Bachao!
Shahajjo korun!

I need your help.

ami aapnar shahajjo chaayi.

I'm lost.

ami hariye gechhi/ raasta bhule gechhi.

I lost my bag.

amar bag hariye geche.

I lost my wallet.

amar parse hariye gechhe.

I'm sick.

amar shoreer bhalo lagchhe na. / amar bhalo lagchhe na.

I've been injured.

ami chot/betha peyechhi .

I need a doctor.

amar ekti daktar chaayi.

Can I use your phone?

apnar phone ta bebohar korte pari ?

Can you help me?

Apni ki amake shahajjo korte parben?

Where is the toilet?

Tôelet ta kothae?
bathroom ta kon dike?

Other Common Terms[edit]

Persons[edit]

Boy

Chhele

Girl

Meye

Gentleman

Bhodrolok

Lady

Bhodromohila

Father

Baabaa

Mother

Maa

Brother

Dada (elder)/ Bhai (young)

Sister

Didi (elder) / Bon (young)

Uncle

Kaku/Kakababu; Mesho/Meshomoshai

Aunt

Kaki/Kakima; Mashi/Mashima

To call a stranger(male)

Just call Dada to youngers & Kaku/Meshomoshai to elderly ones.

To call a stranger(female)

Just call Didi to youngers & Kakima/Mashima to elderly ones.

Animals[edit]

Dog

Kukur

Cow

Goru

Cat

Biral

Goat

Chhagol

Elephant

Haati

Bird

Paakhi

Snake

Shaap

Tiger

Bagh

Rhino

Gondar

Pig

Shuor

Anatomy[edit]

Body

Shorir

Head

Matha

Hair

Chool

Forehead

Kopal

Eyes

Chokh

Nose

Naak

Ears

Kaan

Chin

Gaal

Lips

Thoth

Hand

Haat

Stomach

Pet

Back

Peeth

Leg

Paa

Knee

Haatu

Face

Mukh

Neck

Gola

Shoulder

Kaandh

Finger

Aangul

Chest

Book


Numbers[edit]

0 Shunno
1 Êk
2 Dui
3 Tin
4 Char
5 Pãch
6 Chhôe
7 Shat
8 At
9 Nôe

10 Dôsh
11 Êgaro
12 Baro
13 Têro
14 Chouddo
15 Pônero
16 Sholo
17 Shôtero
18 Atharo
19 Unish

20 Bish / Kuri
30 Trish
40 Chollish
50 Pônchash
60 Shat
70 Shottur
80 Ashi
90 Nobboi

100 Êk sho
200 Dui sho
300 Tin sho
400 Char sho
500 Pãch sho
1000 Êk hajar
10,000 Dôsh hajar
100,000 Êk lakh/lôkkho
10,00,000 Dôsh lakh/lôkkho
100,00,000 Êk kuti

Writing time and date[edit]

Time[edit]

Time

Shomôy

Date

Tarikh

Day

Din

Night

Raatri

Morning

Shokal

Evening

Shondha

Dawn

Bhor

Dusk

Bikal

Clock time[edit]

9:45

Poune Dôsh ta

10:00

Dôsh ta

10:15

Sho-aa-Dôsh ta

10:30

Share Dôsh ta

Duration[edit]

1 Minute

Êk Minit

1 Hour

Êk Ghonta

1 Day

Êk Din

1 Week

Êk Shoptaho

1 Month

Êk Mash

1 Year

Êk Bochhor/Botshor

Days[edit]

Today

ãj-ke

Yesterday

goto-kãl(ke)

Tomorrow

ãgãmi kãl/ kãl-ke

Monday

Shombar

Tuesday

Monggolbar

Wednesday

Budhbar

Thursday

Brihoshpotibar

Friday

Shukrobar

Saturday

Shonibar

Sunday

Robibar

Months[edit]

Bengali calendar[edit]

Choitra

(March-April)

Boishakh

(April-May)

Joishtho

(May-June)

Aashadh

(June-July)

Shrabon

(July-August)

Bhadro

(August-September)

Aashshin

(September-October)

Kaarttik

(October-November)

Agrohayon / Aghraan

(November-December)

Poush

(December-January)

Maagh

(January-Februery)

Phalgun

(February-March)

Colors[edit]

Color

rong

Colorful

rongeen

black

kalo

white

shada

red

lal

pink

golapi

orange

kômola

yellow

holud

green

shobuj

blue

neel

purple

beguni

golden

Shonali

Deep/Dark

garo

Pale/Light

halka

Transportation[edit]

Bus and train[edit]

How much is a ticket to _____ ?

_____ jaowar tiket koto taka'r?

One ticket to _____

_____ jaowar ekti tiket din .

Where does this train go?

Ei train'ti kothay jabe?

Does this train/bus stop in _____?

Ei train/bus 'ti ki _____ 'te daray?

When does the train/bus for _____ leave?

_____ 'jaowar train/bus kokhon chharbe?

When will this train/bus arrive in _____?

Ei train/bus _____ kokhon pouchhobe?

Others[edit]

How do I get to _____ ?

____ porjonto ki bhabe jabo?

Where can I find (some)____

(ektu/kichu) ... kothay pabo? (?)

____sites to see?

...dekhar/ghurar moto jaayga? (...)

Can you show me on the map?

amay/amake map'ta dekhate parben?

Can you tell me the way to _____?

amay/amake _____ 'er rasta bolte parben?

Road

Raastaa

Path/lane

Goli

Towards the _____

_____ 'er dike

Watch for the _____.

_____ dekho

Intersection

Chowraastaa

Directions[edit]

here

ekhane/eikhane

there

okhane/oikhane

(on/to the) right

dan (dike), or say daa-ye

(on/to the) left

bã (dike), or say baa-ye

(on/to the) north

uttor (dike)

(on/to the) south

dokkhin (dike)

(on/to the) east

purbo (dike)

(on/to the) west

poshchim (dike)

straight

shoja

in front

shaamne

behind

pechhone/pichhone
pechhon/pichhon dike

Go (___).

(___) jaan. (formal)
(___) jaao.

Turn around (___).

(___) Ghurun. (formal)
(___) Ghoro.

Keep going (___).

(___) Jete thaakun. (formal)
(___) Jete thaako.

Stop (___).

(___) Thaammun. (formal)
(___) Thaamo.


Lodging[edit]

Do you have any rooms available?

   Bharay ghar paowa jabe ki ? (...) 

How much is a room for one person/two people?

   Ek/Dui joner koto porbe ? (...) 

Does the room come with...

   Ghar'e ---- achhe ki? (...) 

...bedsheets?

   ...bedsheets? (chaador acche ki?) 

May I see the room first?

   Age ghar'ta dekhe nite pari ki? 

Do you have anything quieter?

   Apnar kachhe kono shaanto/chupchaap jaayga achhe ki? 

...bigger?

   ...bigger? (er cheye boro/ ektu boro) 

...cleaner?

   ...cleaner? (er cheye porishkaar / ektu porishkaar) 

...cheaper?

   ...cheaper? (er cheye shostaa /ektu shostaa) 

OK, I'll take it.

   OK, I'll take it. (Theek achhe eta-i nebo) 

I will stay for _____ night(s).

   I will stay for _____ night(s). (____raatri thakbo) 

Can you suggest another hotel?

   Can you suggest another hotel? (Onno kono hotel dekhiye din) 

...lockers?

   ...lockers? (loker achhe ki?)  

What time is breakfast/supper?

   What time is breakfast/supper? (naasta/khabar-er shomoy ki?) 

Please clean my room.

   Please clean my room. (Ghar-ta porishkar kore deben.) 

Can you wake me at _____?

   Can you wake me at _____? (amay____tay deke dite parben ki?)

Money[edit]

Taka : Poysha Do you accept American/Australian/Canadian dollars?

   American/australian/canadian dollar grohon/shikaar koren ki ?) 

Do you accept British pounds?

   British pound grohon/shikaar koren ki? 

Do you accept credit cards?

   Credit Kaard grohon/shikaar koren ki? 

Can you change money for me?

   Taka poribortton korte parben ki ? 

Where can I get money changed?

   Taka poribortton korte kothay parbo ? 

Can you change a traveler's check for me?

   traveler check poribortton korie deben ?  

What is the exchange rate?

   poribortton-er dar koto? 

Where is an automatic teller machine (ATM)?

   A.T.M.-ta kothāy/ kon jāygāy? 

Eating and drinking[edit]

With an emphasis on fish, vegetables and lentils served with rice as a staple diet, Bengali cuisine is known for its subtle (yet sometimes fiery) flavours, and its huge spread of confectioneries and desserts. It also has the only traditionally developed multi-course tradition from the Indian subcontinent that is analogous in structure to the modern service à la russe style of French cuisine, with food served course-wise rather than all at once.

Eating:[edit]

A table for one person/two people, (please).

Êk/dui joner tebil chāyi/hobe/āchhe ki ?

Can I look at the menu, please?

Menu Card ta dekhte pāri ?

Can I look in the kitchen?

Rānnāghar tā dekhte pāri ?

Is there a local specialty?

Ekhānkār bisheshotā/boishishto ki?

I'm a vegetarian.

Ami shākāhāri/nirāmish bhoji.

I don't eat pork.

Ami shuor khāi na.

I don't eat beef.

Ami goru khāi na.

Can you make it "lite", please? (less oil/butter/lard)

Kom tel-e dite pārben/deben?

breakfast

nashtā

lunch

dupoorer khābār

tea (meal)

bikeler/bikāler khābār

dinner

raatrer khabar

I want a _____.

Amar ekti _____ chai.

I want a dish containing _____.

Amar _____ 'er khabar chai

lentils

dāl

(fresh) vegetables

taja shobji

(fresh) fruits

taja phol

bread

paooruti,ruti,naan,parota

Meal

Khabar

rice

bhaat

curry

torkari

egg

deem

meat:

maangsho:
  • beef: goru
  • pork: shuor
  • mutton: khanshi/Patha

sweetmeats

roshogolla, shandesh, roshmalai,

jilepi, amriti, laddu, kalakand, pitha/pithe, payesh, doi, chamcham, pantua/golapjam.
samosa

shingara

spice(s)

moshla

chutney

chatni/tok

gravy

jhal/jhol

ghee (clarified butter)

ghee

poultry:

_____:
  • chicken: murgi
  • duck:hash
  • goose:_____
  • quail:_____

fish:

mach:
  • Hilsha: Ilish

May I have some _____?

Ami ektu _____ pabo ?

salt

noon/lobon

sweet, salty

mishti, nonta

chile

lonka/morich

butter

makhan

It was delicious.

Khub bhalo

Please clear the plates.

plate gulo niye nao

The bill/check, please.

bill/check niye esho.

vegetables:

shobji:
  • potato: aloo
  • cauliflower: phoolkopi
  • cabbage: badhakopi
  • gourd: laoo
  • brinjal: begun
  • carrot: gajor
  • pumpkin: kumro
  • onion: piyaj
  • ginger: aada

friuts:

fol:
  • mango: aam
  • pineapple: anarôsh
  • apple: apel
  • watermelon: tormuj
  • tomato: tomato
  • banana: kola
  • orange: komla lebu
  • lemon: lebu

Drinking/Bars:[edit]

Drinking

Paan kora

May I have a glass/cup/bottle of _____?

Amar jonno ekti glāsh/kāp/boṭol _____ ano

Juice

Rosh/joos

Milk

Doodh

Tea

Cha

Coffee

Kofee

Water

Jôl (More commonly used in India)
Pani (Bangladesh)

Alcohol

Mod

soft drink (attn- in S. Asia this means a sherbet drink, not cola!)

Shorbot

Beer

Biyar

Shopping[edit]

shop

Dokan

stall

Ghumti

Market

Bajar/Haat

Shopping

Bãjãr

Do you have this in my size?

amar saiz'er achhe?

How much is this?

etar daam koto hobe ?

That's too expensive.

Khub daami.

Would you take _____?

aapni ki _____ neben?

I can't afford it.

(...) ami nite parbo naa.

I don't want it.

(...) amar chaayi naa.

You're cheating me.

(...) tumi amay/amake tokachchho.

I'm not interested.

(..) amar kono ichchhe nei.

OK, I'll take it.

(...) achha ami eta nebo.

Can I have a bag?

(...) apni amay ekti bag deben?

Do you ship (overseas)?

(...) Bideshe parcel koren ki?

I need...

amar ... chaayi

...soap.

... shaban

...pain reliever. (e.g., aspirin or ibuprofen)

bethar oshud/ pain killer

...cold medicine.

kashir oshud/ cough syrup

...stomach medicine.

peter oshud

...a razor.

rezar

...an umbrella.

chhātā

...a postcard.

posṭ kārḍ

...postage stamp.

ḍāk tikit/sṭamp

...batteries.

beṭarī

...writing paper.

kāgoj

...a pen.

kolom

...a pencil

pensil

...an English-language book.

Ingreji boi.

... an English-language magazine.

Ingreji patrika/magazine.

'...an English-language newspaper.

Ingreji khoborkagoj/newspaper.

...an English-Bengali dictionary.

Ingreji-Bangla Shabdokosh/dikshinaary.


Clothes[edit]

clothe(s)

kãpor
kãpor kãchã is Washing Clothes

Driving[edit]

I want to rent a car.

ami ekti gari bhara korte chaayi.

gas (petrol) station

peṭrol pump.

petrol

peṭrol

diesel

ḍīzel

get out of the way

raasta theke shore daaran.


Note: Indian Traffic Signs are much like those in Europe. Words are written in English and sometimes the regional language.

Writing system[edit]

Bengali is written using the Bengali alphabet (Bengali: বাংলা হরফ Bangla hôrôf, Bengali: বাংলা লিপি Bangla lipi) and is the 6th most widely used writing system in the world. The script with minor variations is shared by Assamese and is the basis for the other languages like Meitei and Bishnupriya Manipuri. All these languages are spoken in the eastern region of South Asia. Historically, the script has also been used to write the Sanskrit language in the same region.

Bangali dialects[edit]

Bangali dialects include Eastern and Southeastern Bengali dialects: The Eastern dialects serve as the primary colloquial language of the Dhaka district. They do not have contrastive nasalized vowels or a distinction in approximant র /ɹ/ and flap ড়/ঢ় /ɽ/, pronouncing them all as র /ɹ/. This is also true of the Sylheti dialect, which has a lot in common with the Kamrupi dialect of Assam in particular, and is often considered a separate language. The Eastern dialects extend into Southeastern dialects, which include parts of Chittagong. The Chittagongian dialect has Tibeto-Burman influences.

Manikganj: Êk zoner duiđi saoal asilo. (P)
Mymensingh: Êk zôner dui put asil. (P)
Munshiganj (Bikrampur): Êk jôner duiđa pola asilo. (P)
Comilla: Êk bêđar dui put asil. (P)
Noakhali (Sandwip): Êk shôksher dui beţa asilo.
Noakhali (Feni): Êk zôner dui hola asil. (P)
Noakhali (Hatia): Êk zôn mainsher duga hola asil. (P)
Noakhali (Ramganj): Ek zôner dui hut asil. (P)
Barisal (Bakerganj): Êk zôn mansher dugga pola asil. (P)
Faridpur: Kero mansher duga pola asil. (P)
Sylhet: Ekh beṭar dui phut/phua asil/aslo. (M)
Chittagong: Egua mansher dua poa asil. (P)

South Bengal dialects[edit]

Chuadanga : Êk jon lokir duiţo chheile chhilo. (M)
Khulna: Êk zon manshir dui sôoal silo. (P)
Jessore: Êk zoner duţ sôl sêl. (P)

North Bengal dialects[edit]

This dialect is mainly spoken in the districts of North Bengal. These are the only dialects in Bangladesh that pronounce the letters চ, ছ, জ, and ঝ as affricates [tʃ], [tʃʰ], [dʒ], and [dʒʱ], respectively, and preserve the breathy-voiced stops in all parts of the word, much like Western dialects (including Standard Bengali). The dialects of Rangpur and Pabna do not have contrastive nasalized vowels.

Dinajpur: Êk manusher dui chhaoa chhilô (P)
Pabna: Kono mansher dui chhaoal chhilô. (P)
Bogra: Êk jhôner dui bêţa chhoil achhilô. (P)
East Malda: Êk jhôn manuser duţa bêţa achhlô. (P)
Rangpur: Êk zon mansher duikna bêţa asil. (P)

Western Border dialects[edit]

This dialect is spoken in the area which is known as Manbhum.

Manbhumi: Ek loker duţa beţa chhilô. (M)
Hajong: Ek zôn manôlôg duida pôla thakibar.
Chakma: Ek jônôtun diba poa el.

The later two, along with Kharia Thar and Mal Paharia, are closely related to Western Bengali dialects, but are typically classified as separate languages. Similarly, Rajbangsi and Hajong are considered separate languages, although they are very similar to North Bengali dialects. There are many more minor dialects as well, including those spoken in the bordering districts of Purnea and Singhbhum and among the tribals of the eastern Bangladesh like the Hajong and the Chakma.

Authority[edit]

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