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Beaudry Provincial Park

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Western Manitoba : Beaudry Provincial Park
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Beaudry Provincial Park is in Western Manitoba.

Understand[edit]

History[edit]

Beaudry Provincial Park was assembled beginning in 1975 by the Province of Manitoba from several privately owned landholdings along the Assiniboine River west of the Town of Headingley, Manitoba.

The major portion of the park is comprised of a 2,000 acre landholding featuring five miles of frontage on the south side of the river that had been owned by prominent Winnipeg businessman and mining entrepreneur J. D. Perrin. He had purchased a 1,200 acre farm from England's Pilkington family (of Pilkington Glass fame) in 1944. The Pilkingtons had owned the property since the early 1920's. J. D. Perrin named the property Beaudry Farm, after Canadian National Railway's Beaudry Station, which was located adjacent to the farm on the CN line originally built by the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway and used from 1894 to 1972. The Beaudry name had derived from a family that had once owned large sections of land in the area in the early years of the 20th century.

After 1950, the property was jointly owned by J. D. Perrin and his son J. D. (Jack) Perrin, Jr. The Perrin property was expanded with the purchase in 1963 of the neighbouring 600 acre farm to the East owned by the Les Fansett family. Around the same time, the Perrins had purchased from CN the abandoned Beaudry Station and relocated it to the bank of the Assiniboine River near the entrance to the present park's riverbottom forest hiking and skiing trails. These trails had been hand cut through the riverbottom forest area for horseback trail riding by Jack Perrin's children, John, Suzanne and Marshall. The station building was fully rehabilitated and used by J. D. Perrin, until his death in 1967, and his wife Ruth as a country retreat until it was destroyed by fire during the winter of 1977. Jack Perrin and his family had constructed a ranch house on the riverbank a short distance south of the station house.

Under the Perrin family's ownership approximately 1,200 acres of the Beaudry property were under cultivation, while the remaining 800 acres of river bottom forest and other natural forested habitats were carefully preserved. The entire holding was made off-limits to hunters. Much of the farming was done by Perrin's Farm Manager, Hildebrand Van Wyk, who with his wife Shirley and children were prominent members of the Headingley and St. Francois Xavier area community.

South of the CN line, along a small chain of "lakes" known locally by some today as Perrin Lakes, a dam had been built by Ducks Unlimited to preserve the wetlands and, while prohibiting hunting, the Perrins permitted the Manitoba Gun Dog Association for many years to operate a seasonal clubhouse for dog training and trials.

In 1975, the Manitoba Government of Premier Edward Schreyer decided to expropriate the Perrin holdings to commence the establishment of the park and over the years other properties on the north side of the river were acquired to create today's Beaudry Provincial Park.

Landscape[edit]

River-bottom forest and tall grass prairie.

Flora and fauna[edit]

Basswood, cottonwood and maple trees, ferns and grapevines. White-tailed deer, fox, owls, raccoons, beaver and muskrat.

Climate[edit]

Get in[edit]

Access is via a short gravel drive off of Provincial Road 241 west of Headingley.

Fees/Permits[edit]

Vehicle permit is required, though they are not available in the park, and there is no specific direction given on where to obtain one.

Parks Passes are generally available at local hardware stores and gas stations in the city of Winnipeg. Generally at the same locations that sell fishing licences and outdoor supplies, as well as at other provincial parks with camp grounds (and hence on-site staff)

For 2009 and 2010 the government had waived the need for Park passes, however permits are once again required for the 2012 season.

Get around[edit]

See[edit][add listing]

Do[edit][add listing]

There are several short hiking trails that double as cross-country ski trails in the winter.

Buy[edit][add listing]

Eat[edit][add listing]

Drink[edit][add listing]

Sleep[edit][add listing]

Lodging[edit]

Camping[edit]

Camping is not permitted.

Backcountry[edit]

Stay safe[edit]

Get out[edit]


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